Women

Listings shown are sorted alphabetically.

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Marian Anderson -- Singer, Civil Rights icon. SP inscribed “To __ Yours truly Marian Anderson”. The early 8 x 10 b & w glossy photo is a striking image with a noticeable crease in the lower right corner. Undated but probably signed in the 1930’s or early ‘40’s.

$250.00
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The author and poet, most famous for her poem America the Beautiful, requests a copy of Richard Hakluyt's translation of Ferdinando de Soto's "Virginia Richly Valued…" The signed document, dated "Sept 8" no year, is a library request slip and signed in full: "Katherine Lee Bates". The 8 x 3.5 slip is mounted to a still card stock of the same size. [#4751]

$200.00
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Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winning author

Letter signed on her personal stationary Perkasie, Pennsylvania April 5, 1958. Buck writes to Emanuel Friedman about a business proposal or request for an engagement and lets him know her business agent will be in touch with him. The letter is boldly signed “Pearl S. Buck” and is in excellent condition. [#1046]

$125.00
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1st Woman to win a Pulitzer for Drama

Zona Gale, author 2 page ALS Dec. 13, 1934 on a folded four page sheet of stationary from The Gotham hotel in New York. A brief thank you note for sending some material and mentions she is on her way home to Portage Wisconsin. Gale was a playwright and the first woman to win a Pulitzer for Drama. [#4889]

$75.00
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Author of Mary Had A Little Lamb and advocate for Thanksgiving Day

Sarah Josepha Hale author, poet and influential editor. One page ALS Febry, 3, 1848(?), to one of her publishers Carey & Hart suggesting that it might be better if they sent her poems to editors in her city than other cities. Hale wrote “Mary Had A Little Lamb” and is credited with pushing Abraham Lincoln to declare a national day of Prayer and Thanksgiving in 1863.

$250.00
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Poet, abolitionist, feminist

Signed card, 4 1/2 x 2 1/2, "Know your calling, your country, and your sex. Julia Ward Howe July 1889". Excellent condition . [#3654]

$350.00
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desriable White House letter as First Lady

Lady Bird Johnson signed letter as First Lady with a holograph salutation. The First Lady thanks Gerald Wagner for a white orchid and a United Nations concert. She has crossed out the formal salutation and handwritten “Gerry” as well as signing the letter in full “Lady Bird Johnson”. The letter is on White House stationary with the blind embossed presidential seal. The October 23, 1968 letter was written just two weeks before the election of Richard Nixon and the start of her transition back to private life. There is a stamped docket on the reverse of the letter. Although not a rare autograph, Lady Bird’s autographs as First Lady are seen less often than other periods and her White House letters are desirable. [# 4225]

$0.00
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First woman to be on a ballot for President

Belva Lockwood one page ALS 1/14/1889, Kansas City, Mo responding to an autograph request. Lockwood was a leading women’s rights advocate breaking several gender barriers. She was the first female attorney to argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court and the first to be on ballot for President. Her letters are uncommon to scarce.

$850.00
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Considered the "first female" American astronomer she discovered a comet, later named for her, in 1847. This is a closely clipped signature, probably from an album page. [#4188]

$100.00
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Poet and author (1835-1908) ALS April (n.y.) on the front and back of a small folded sheet sending a small donation to a charity. [#4657]

$100.00
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Her New York tour

Carrie Amelia Nation –signed slip of notepaper from the Hotel Victoria in New York “Carrie A Nation/ your/ Loving Home Defender/ Sep. 1st 1901.” Nation gained national fame as a temperance leader by using a hatchet to chop at saloon bar and destroy bottles of liquor. Her more peaceful strategy was to be provocative and disruptive in public often drawing more attention to the cause by being arrested. Although considered unstable at times she was a natural marketer and eventually changed her name to the alternative spelling to create her eponymous rallying cry “Carry A Nation”. In many ways she was the model of the modern protester method of using civil disobedience and obnoxious techniques of public disruption to provoke reactions and even arrest or assault.

The national attention from her hatchet attacks made her a national sensation. In the summer of 1901 she began a tour of the Eastern US giving lectures, signing autographs and where she could, being provocative towards saloon keepers and public officials. She stayed at the Victoria on her New York visit which included a “press availability” at the hotel on the 1st. In one of the more notable stunts she tried to confront famed prize boxer turned saloon owner John L. Sullivan. Days earlier he boasted that if she came near his place he would stuff her down a sewer. When Nation and her crowd visited the saloon demanding to see him Sullivan was nowhere to be found. He had enough good sense not to be baited into giving her more publicity.

The 6 x 4 notepaper is in excellent condition with one flattened fold line that runs through the “N” of her last name. It is an excellent dated example of her signature with one of her favorite monikers. [#5070]

$700.00
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Patricia Nixon signed letter on White House stationary, June 2, 1972 signed "Pat Nixon" to Virginia Sherwood expressing sympathy on the death of her son, along with the White House envelope. [#4708]

$125.00